Posts Tagged ‘The Amityville Horror’

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From the Producer’s Corner

by Andrea Adams
March 9th, 2012

It’s been six months since our last blog entry. While it pains me to write this fact, we have certainly not been idle. After extensive internal discussion, we ended up re-editing a lot of what had already been completed, cutting out story lines and angles that were ultimately felt to be unnecessary to the most important goal of My Amityville Horror: portraying Daniel Lutz’s point of view and relating in an interesting and cinematic way what truly was and remains his Amityville horror. In turn, the documentary is stronger, leaner and flows very well. This is fantastic to relate as many of the decisions that brought us to this point were strongly debated during production meetings.

This is where we are now. We are nearing completion in post on our newly recut documentary, awaiting final sound (design and mix done by Ronnie van der Veer) and score (composed for us by Herman Witkam). We are excited to have a soundtrack to the film that will accentuate the emotions elicited by our subjects and are eager to finally have a finished work that we can truly be proud of – especially because we are so looking forward to sharing the film with all of you.


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The Real Amityville Horror

by Eric Walter
May 27th, 2011

I did something interesting recently. I went back and reread The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson, something that I haven’t done in a number of years. As a kid, I couldn’t put the book down, and as many people who are interested in this topic have, I went about doing my own research into the story. And now, many years later, I’m sitting in post-production on the very documentary that I, as a fellow Amityville enthusiast, have been waiting to see: testimony from someone other than George and Kathy Lutz about their experiences inside the house. But, not just that – an examination of the psychological effects this story has had on Daniel Lutz’s life.

It was interesting revisiting Jay Anson’s book. His retelling of the Lutzes’ haunting claims is, without a doubt, the most effective account ever put into print, despite the multitude of books and films on the subject. Sadly though, I have to wonder why George and Kathy would have allowed the book to be fictionalized to such a degree if they were so concerned, as the book states, “that too much was being overstated and exaggerated.”

From its very outset, the Lutzes’ story was tainted by the media and its apparent hunger to sensationalize their experiences. On the heels of another recently announced Amityville film, The Amityville Horror: The Lost Tapes, which curiously seems to mimic Laura DiDio’s role in the case, it seems no one is safe from the Amityville machine.

The real Amityville Horror isn’t just what has happened in the past, but how it has continued to manifest itself in the present. Did any of it really happen? I feel the real story here is one that has never been told. It’s that gray area. It’s a story about the dynamics within the Lutz family at the time. In the end, the ghost stories are just that – stories. No one can confirm or deny their veracity. But, there’s no question these events, hoax or not, had an enormous impact on each member of the Lutz family in different ways. That’s what I’m interested in and that’s exactly what I believe will set this documentary apart from competing material.


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Through the Lens

by Charlie Anderson
January 17th, 2011

I’ve never been one for documentaries. Sure, I’ve seen a few in my time, but I’ve never really been drawn to them. That notion escaped me the day that I was asked to meet Eric Walter.  I got a phone call from my friend Brandon Cater saying that his friend in LA was producing a documentary and that he was looking to shoot on the RED, and that I was the go-to guy for the job. I talked to Eric for a good bit last January about his project, not knowing what to expect.  He told me he was producing a documentary about the Amityville Horror.  That instantly got my attention.  Like I said, I’ve never shot a documentary before; I’ve been approached before but nothing really caught my interest the way Eric’s pitch did.  I was instantly hooked.  Eric asked me to put together some ideas and numbers and we’d talk later on once he got some things in place.

A few months went by and Eric kept in touch with me, just letting me know things were going smoothly, the usual talk that I’ve been fed by producers over the years.  What made this different for me was when I actually met Eric in March.  Now most indie producers (mainly for films) are all talk and no show, Eric was no talk and ALL show, which impressed me.  I met up with him after I had just finished shooting another movie in LA.  Originally, I had this notion that I was not going to end up shooting this.  Boy, was I wrong.  When I met Eric, he promptly gave me the break down on everything he had been planning, from showing me script breakdowns, to story boards, to audio interviews he’d previously conducted with Danny Lutz, to articles clipped and organized.  I was flabbergasted. I definitely didn’t think I was going to be walking away with this documentary, but again I was wrong.  Eric had seen my reel, he had seen movies that I’d previously shot (he did his homework), and was dead set on making me the Director of Photography.  What choice did I have but to dive into this? (more…)